Home / World News / “When the least get together, something new happens” – The Denver Post

“When the least get together, something new happens” – The Denver Post

Colorado leaders including veterans of civil rights struggles on Sunday launched Denver’s commemoration of Martin Luther King, 50 years after his assassination, stoked by President Donald Trump’s latest remarks about who should have a place in America and scrambling for traction in a fresh push for social and economic peace.

They urged a big turnout Monday for Denver’s march from City Park to Civic Center. They called for political action to tackle systemic problems from unfair labor laws to “the prison-industrial complex.”

A half century after King led millions making a stand, “we also are standing in the shadows of some deep sorrow in our country,” the Rev. Terrence Hughes, president of the Greater Metro Denver Ministerial Alliance, told a crowd of 500 at the Friendship Baptist Church of Christ Jesus in east Denver.

“It is what unites us that is important,” Hughes said.

“We know the president has said some things that were disparaging of African nations,” he said, referring to widely quoted comments from an Oval Office meeting about immigration from countries of Africa and Haiti.

“It really is upon us to come together and speak out against it. …  We all have a moral obligation to challenge that which is challenging us. … He is saying things to people of African descent right in this country. … He is very thorough in his ability to offend.”

Members of the congregation listen as pastor Terrence Hughes, president of Greater Metro Denver Ministerial Alliance, speaks during an interfaith service at Friendship Baptist Church of Christ Jesus on Jan. 14, 2018 in Denver.

Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Members of the congregation listen as pastor Terrence Hughes, president of Greater Metro Denver Ministerial Alliance, speaks during an interfaith service at Friendship Baptist Church of Christ Jesus on Jan. 14, 2018 in Denver.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock referred to “atrocities.” U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat from Colorado, told people in the church that he recently went to Nigeria, Gambia, Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire on a swing that included checking out a former slave-trading hub by a church — a place that he said former President Barack Obama had visited.

“Our president ought to make a visit to that place, so that he understands what he is talking about,” Bennet said.

Former Mayor Wellington Webb called this “ a strange time, but not an unusual time,” referring to “the white nationalist who is president of the United States” and history from transatlantic slave ships through “reconstruction” and the Great Depression.

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