Home / World News / Loveland’s Fyn River Farms prototype grows basil with nutrients produced by fish – The Denver Post

Loveland’s Fyn River Farms prototype grows basil with nutrients produced by fish – The Denver Post

Jason Rider, co-owner of Fyn River Farms, clips basil from some plants Tuesday at the indoor farm on the outskirts of Loveland. Goldfish provide most of the nutrients for the hydroponically grown basil plants.

Jenny Sparks, Reporter-Herald

Jason Rider, co-owner of Fyn River Farms, clips basil from some plants Tuesday at the indoor farm on the outskirts of Loveland. Goldfish provide most of the nutrients for the hydroponically grown basil plants.

The farmers at Fyn River Farms near Loveland don’t have much acreage to speak of, and their hired hands don’t even have hands. That’s the way of this aquaponic operation: The field is inside a building, and most of the workers are goldfish who create the nutrients to feed the crops.

Business partners Jason Rider and Mike Bennett have converted a 2,400-square-foot shop building just east of Loveland into an indoor growing operation that they call a farm. The system was ready to go in mid-January, and they are harvesting basil leaves as big as their hands now.

Fyn River Farms’ prototype farm is an aquaponic operation, combining aquaculture — the growing of aquatic animals or plants — with hydroponics, the growing of crops in water.

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