Home / World News / Capitol tree heads back to Montana for possible use in park thanks to Denver nonprofit – The Denver Post

Capitol tree heads back to Montana for possible use in park thanks to Denver nonprofit – The Denver Post

By Amy Beth Hanson, The Associated Press

HELENA, Mont. — The spruce tree destined to serve as the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree was carefully selected from a Montana forest and hauled across the country in a special truck to preserve its freshness.

The 79-foot-tall (24-meter-tall) tree, which was lit up last month during a ceremony with congressional members, had its own website and social media presence.

Now, some Montana companies hope to keep its fame alive by trucking it back home so it can be used to help rebuild a historic chalet in Glacier National Park that was destroyed in a wildfire last summer.

FILE- This Aug. 31, 2017, file ...

Hutton IncidentTeam via AP, File

This Aug. 31, 2017, file image from video provided by the Hutton Incident Team shows the historic main Sperry Chalet building engulfed in flames in Glacier National Park, Mont. Some Montana companies hope to keep the fame of the spruce tree that served as the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree alive by trucking the tree back home to Montana. Organizers hope it can be used to help rebuild a century-old chalet in Glacier National Park that was destroyed in a wildfire last summer.

Some critics questioned the amount of fuel that would be burned to haul the tree back across the U.S. when Montana has plenty of trees, while others didn’t mind as long as taxpayer money wasn’t involved.

The effort is certainly more sentimental than practical, but no public money is being spent and no one can profit from the tree’s use, said Bruce Ward with Choose Outdoors, the Denver-based nonprofit that organized the effort to bring the tree to Washington.

Ward got in on the idea after SmartLam, a Montana wood products company, contacted him about doing something besides letting the celebrated tree end up as mulch for the Capitol lawn.

A few phone calls and goodwill gestures later, plans call for the tree to come back in pieces. It was removed Tuesday morning, officials said.

F.H. Stoltz Land & Lumber in Columbia Falls has agreed to process the wood, but vice president and general manager Chuck Roady noted that spruce is a softer wood and more suited for door or window frames or fireplace mantles than structural use in the new park chalet.

Glacier officials are waiting to see how the still-standing rock walls of the Sperry Chalet fare over the winter before deciding on any restoration plans, park spokeswoman Lauren Alley said.

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